Review: The Gentlemen. It's a Guy Party.


photo: STX Films/Miramax

photo: STX Films/Miramax

photo: STX Films/Miramax

The Gentlemen

review: Angie Bosio

In Guy Ritchie’s The Gentlemen Matthew McConaughey is Mickey Pearson, an American expat in London with a marijuana empire that may or may not be for sale. The story unfolds in what appears to be a game of cat and mouse between Hugh Grant’s private investigator, Fletcher, and Pearson’s number one, Charlie Hunnam’s, Ray. As a Guy Ritchie film, The Gentlemen does not disappoint. It is full of quippy dialogue, entertaining cutaways, good pacing and a bit of humor alongside most of the violence. Overall the movie is a lot of fun. It is classic Guy Ritchie, but in 2020 can anyone be ‘classic’ anymore?

The only woman in the entire 153 minute film is Mickey Pearson’s wife Rosalind. Michelle Dockery holds her own in the role among all the guys. She is just as whitty, confident, and business savvy as her husband. Unfortunately in her only action sequence, she out-guns her opponents with ‘Mary Sue’ precision only to be eventually incapacitated (in the most un ‘me too’) way for the sole purpose of driving the motivation for her husband's revenge brutality. Add to that the blatant self aggrandizing Miramax plug at the end. And was that really Harvey Weinstein behind the desk? I suppose hoping for better female representation in a film titled “The Gentlemen” is too high a standard. But in 2020, one has to ask who would even green light such a script? Oh, that’s right, Miramax!

Angie Bosio is a guest film critic, mastered in film studies at the University of Kansas, has co-written over a dozen dramas and musicals in Nashville. Angie also reviews films from a Catholic perspective for Nashville Catholic Radio.